Thursday, December 22, 2016

Free Trial Request

Monday, December 19, 2016

Issue Current Genomics Vol.18 Issue 1

Wednesday, December 14, 2016

Friday, December 9, 2016

Free Online Issue of Current Genomics

Thursday, November 24, 2016

Free Trial Request

Free Trial Request


 Free Trial Request

Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Call For Paper

Bentham Science Publishers would like to invite you to submit your research paper for publishing in the Journal of



Wednesday, November 2, 2016

Highlighted Article: Toxicogenomics to Evaluate Endocrine Disrupting Effects of Environmental Chemicals Using the Zebrafish Model



Toxicogenomics to Evaluate Endocrine Disrupting Effects of Environmental Chemicals Using the Zebrafish Model


Author(s):

Karina Caballero-Gallardo, Jesus Olivero-Verbel and Jennifer L. Freeman   Pages 515 - 527 ( 13 )

Abstract:


The extent of our knowledge on the number of chemical compounds related to anthropogenic activities that can cause damage to the environment and to organisms is increasing. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are one group of potentially hazardous substances that include natural and synthetic chemicals and have the ability to mimic endogenous hormones, interfering with their biosynthesis, metabolism, and normal functions. Adverse effects associated with EDC exposure have been documented in aquatic biota and there is widespread interest in the characterization and understanding of their modes of action. Fish are considered one of the primary risk organisms for EDCs. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are increasingly used as an animal model to study the effects of endocrine disruptors, due to their advantages compared to other model organisms. One approach to assess the toxicity of a compound is to identify those patterns of gene expression found in a tissue or organ exposed to particular classes of chemicals, through new technologies in genomics (toxicogenomics), such as microarrays or whole-genome sequencing. Application of these technologies permit the quantitative analysis of thousands of gene expression changes simultaneously in a single experiment and offer the opportunity to use transcript profiling as a tool to predict toxic outcomes of exposure to particular compounds. The application of toxicogenomic tools for identification of chemicals with endocrine disrupting capacity using the zebrafish model system is reviewed.

Keywords:

Danio rerio, Endocrine disruptors, Environmental pollutants, Fish, Omics, Toxicity, Toxicogenomics, Zebrafish.

Affiliation:

School of Health Sciences, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, HAMP-1263D Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA.

Graphical Abstract:



For More Informtion Please visit Our Website Current Genomoics




Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Most Accessed Article: A Genome-wide Association Analysis in Four Populations Reveals Strong Genetic Heterogeneity For Birth Weight



A Genome-wide Association Analysis in Four Populations Reveals Strong Genetic Heterogeneity For Birth Weight
Author(s):
Tiane Luo, Xu Liu and Yuehua CuiPages 416-426 (11)
Abstract:

Low or high birth weight is one of the main causes for neonatal morbidity and mortality. They are also associated with adulthood chronic illness. Birth weight is a complex trait which is affected by baby’s genes, maternal environments as well as the complex interactions between them. To understand the genetic basis of birth weight, we reanalyzed a genome-wide association study data set which consists of four populations, namely Thai, Afro-Caribbean, European, and Hispanic population with regular linear models. In addition to fit the data with parametric linear models, we fitted the data with a nonparametric varying-coefficient model to identify variants that are nonlinearly modulated by mother’s condition to affect birth weight. For this purpose, we used baby’s cord glucose level as the mother’s environmental variable. At the 10-5 genome-wide threshold, we identified 33 SNP variants in the Thai population, 26 SNPs in the Afro-Caribbean population, 18 SNPs in the European population, and 7 SNPs in the Hispanic population. Some of the variants are significantly modulated by baby’s cord glucose level either linearly or nonlinearly, implying potential interactions between baby’s gene and mother’s glucose level to affect baby’s birth weight. There is no overlap between variants identified in the four populations, indicating strong genetic heterogeneity of birth weight between the four ethnic groups. The findings of this study provide insights into the genetic basis of birth weight and reveal its genetic heterogeneity.
Keywords:
Gene-environment interaction, Genetic association, Nonlinear modulation, Varying-coefficient model, Birth weight, Four population.
Affiliation:
Division of Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Shanxi Medical University, Shanxi, 030001, P.R. China.
Graphical Abstract:



For More Information Please Visit Our Website Current Genomics


Thursday, October 20, 2016

Free Trial Offer

Free Trial Offer


Wednesday, October 5, 2016

New Issue ::: Current Genomics 17, Issue 4



Current Genomics is a peer-reviewed journal that provides essential reading for academic, clinical, government and pharmaceutical scientists who wish to be kept informed and up-to-date with the latest and most important developments in genome science and systems modeling.
Current Genomics publishes three types of peer-reviewed articles including:
  1. i) High-quality research papersreporting on new and original data generated at the genome scale level, including meta-analysis studies. Systems biology, molecular systems modeling, molecular evolution, developmental biology, aging research and human disease research are topics of particular interest. Position papers dealing with new or complex methodological approaches whether experimental or mathematical are greatly welcome in this section.
  2. ii) Authoritative and comprehensive reviewsfrom widely-recognized experts, covering all the latest and outstanding developments in genome science and computational/systems biology. Proposals for mini-hot topics (2-3 review papers) and full hot topics (6-8 review papers) are welcome in this section and they should not contain original data. Guest edited issues provide expert views on specific questions giving an extensive and comprehensive analysis of a specific field of activities in genomics. All aspects of genetic analysis and gene function will be covered, particularly in the growing areas of human genomics, functional genomics and next generation sequencing, molecular evolution, developmental biology, aging research and systems/statistical modeling.
iii) Opinion papers from internationally and widely recognized experts addressing contemporary questions and issues in the field of genome science and systems biology and basic and clinical research practices.
p

Articles from the journal Current Genomics, Volume 17, Issue 4:



For details on the articles, please visit this link :: http://bit.ly/2aixpmz

courtesy by : https://benthamsciencepublishers.wordpress.com/2016/08/01/new-issue-current-genomics-17-issue-4/

Highlighted article from the journal Current Genomics Vol 17 issue 4



courtesy by https://benthamsciencepublishers.wordpress.com/2016/02/01/highlighted-article-from-the-journal-current-genomics-vol-17-issue-4/

Recently Published Issue Of the Journal Current Genomics



Current Genomics is a peer-reviewed journal that provides essential reading for academic, clinical, government and pharmaceutical scientists who wish to be kept informed and up-to-date with the latest and most important developments in genome science and systems modeling.
Current Genomics publishes three types of peer-reviewed articles including:
  1. i) High-qualityresearch papersreporting on new and original data generated at the genome scale level, including meta-analysis studies. Systems biology, molecular systems modeling, molecular evolution, developmental biology, aging research and human disease research are topics of particular interest. Position papers dealing with new or complex methodological approaches whether experimental or mathematical are greatly welcome in this section.
  2. ii) Authoritative and comprehensivereviewsfrom widely-recognized experts, covering all the latest and outstanding developments in genome science and computational/systems biology. Proposals for mini-hot topics (2-3 review papers) and full hot topics (6-8 review papers) are welcome in this section and they should not contain original data. Guest edited issues provide expert views on specific questions giving an extensive and comprehensive analysis of a specific field of activities in genomics. All aspects of genetic analysis and gene function will be covered, particularly in the growing areas of human genomics, functional genomics and next generation sequencing, molecular evolution, developmental biology, aging research and systems/statistical modeling.
iii) Opinion papers from internationally and widely recognized experts addressing contemporary questions and issues in the field of genome science and systems biology and basic and clinical research practices.
Following are the articles from the journal Current Genomics, 16 issue 1:
Author(s): Zhi-Ping Liu
Article: siRNA-directed DNA Methylation in Plants
Author(s): Meng Xie and Bin Yu
Article: Genes and Conditions Controlling Mammalian Pre- and Post-implantation Embryo Development
Author(s): G. Anifandis, C.I. Messini, K. Dafopoulos and I.E. Messinis

Author(s): John Castiblanco and Juan-Manuel Anaya
Author(s): Ryan G. Thys, Christine E. Lehman, Levi C. T. Pierce and Yuh-Hwa Wang
For details, please visit: http://bit.ly/18JfbGo
courtesy by : https://benthamsciencepublishers.wordpress.com/2015/02/17/recently-published-issue-of-the-journal-current-genomics/

High Impact Factor Journal:::Current Genomics



Current Genomics is a peer-reviewed journal that provides essential reading for academic, clinical, government and pharmaceutical scientists who wish to be kept informed and up-to-date with the latest and most important developments in genome science and systems modeling.
Current Genomics publishes three types of peer-reviewed articles including:
i) High-quality research papers reporting on new and original data generated at the genome scale level, including meta-analysis studies. Systems biology, molecular systems modeling, molecular evolution, developmental biology, aging research and human disease research are topics of particular interest. Position papers dealing with new or complex methodological approaches whether experimental or mathematical are greatly welcome in this section.
ii) Authoritative and comprehensive reviews from widely-recognized experts, covering all the latest and outstanding developments in genome science and computational/systems biology. Proposals for mini-hot topics (2-3 review papers) and full hot topics (6-8 review papers) are welcome in this section and they should not contain original data. Guest edited issues provide expert views on specific questions giving an extensive and comprehensive analysis of a specific field of activities in genomics. All aspects of genetic analysis and gene function will be covered, particularly in the growing areas of human genomics, functional genomics and next generation sequencing, molecular evolution, developmental biology, aging research and systems/statistical modeling.
iii) Opinion papers from internationally and widely recognized experts addressing contemporary questions and issues in the field of genome science and systems biology and basic and clinical research practices.
CGT
mostopen ccesstrial request
FacebookLogo
courtesy by : https://benthamsciencepublishers.wordpress.com/2015/07/27/high-impact-factor-journalcurrent-genomics/

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

MicroRNAs: Important Epigenetic Regulators in Osteoarthritis

Author(s):

Tomasz Trzeciak and Malwina Czarny-RatajczakPages 481-484 (4)

Abstract:


Multiple mechanisms are implicated in the development of primary osteoarthritis (OA), in which genetic and epigenetic factors appear to interact with environmental factors and age to initiate the disease and stimulate its progression. Changes in expression of microRNAs (miRs) contribute to development of osteoarthritis. Numerous miRs are involved in cartilage development, homeostasis and degradation through targeting genes expressed in this tissue. An important regulator of gene expression in human cartilage is miR-140, which directly targets a gene coding aggrecanase ADAMTS-5, that cleaves aggrecan in cartilage. This miR is considered a biological marker for cartilage and its level significantly decreases in OA cartilage. On the other hand, increased expression of miR-146a in early OA inhibits two other cartilage-degrading enzymes: MMP13 and ADAMTS4, and may provide a useful tool in developing treatments for OA. The COL2A1 gene, encoding collagen type II, which is the most abundant structural protein of the cartilage, is silenced by miR-34a and activated by miR-675. Every year, new targets of cartilage miRs are validated experimentally and this opens new possibilities for new therapies that control joint destruction and stimulate cartilage repair. At the same time development of next-generation sequencing technologies allows to identify new miRs involved in cartilage biology.

Keywords:

Gene expression profiling, MicroRNAs, Cartilage, Osteoarthritis.

Affiliation:

Tulane University, School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Center for Aging, 1430 Tulane Ave., SL-12, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.


Read Full-Text article

Changing Faces of Transcriptional Regulation Reflected by Zic3

Author(s):

Cecilia Lanny Winata, Igor Kondrychyn and Vladimir KorzhPages 117-127 (11)

Abstract:


The advent of genomics in the study of developmental mechanisms has brought a trove of information on gene datasets and regulation during development, where the Zic family of zinc-finger proteins plays an important role. Genomic analysis of the modes of action of Zic3 in pluripotent cells demonstrated its requirement for maintenance of stem cells pluripotency upon binding to the proximal regulatory regions (promoters) of genes associated with cell pluripotency (Nanog, Sox2, Oct4, etc.) as well as cell cycle, proliferation, oncogenesis and early embryogenesis. In contrast, during gastrulation and neurulation Zic3 acts by binding the distal regulatory regions (enhancers, etc) associated with control of gene transcription in the Nodal and Wnt signaling pathways, including genes that act to break body symmetry. This illustrates a general role of Zic3 as a transcriptional regulator that acts not only alone, but in many instances in conjunction with other transcription factors. The latter is done by binding to adjacent sites in the context of multi-transcription factor complexes associated with regulatory elements.

Keywords:

Enhancer, Gastrulation, Left-right asymmetry, Neurogenesis, Promoter, Stem cells, Transcription, Zebrafish.

Affiliation:

International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Warsaw, Poland.

Graphical Abstract:



Read Full-Text article

    RNA Silencing in Plants: Mechanisms, Technologies and Applications in Horticultural Crops

    Author(s):

    Qigao Guo, Qing Liu, Neil A. Smith, Guolu Liang and Ming-Bo WangPages 1-14 (14)

    Abstract:


    Understanding the fundamental nature of a molecular process or a biological pathway is often a catalyst for the development of new technologies in biology. Indeed, studies from late 1990s to early 2000s have uncovered multiple overlapping but functionally distinct RNA silencing pathways in plants, including the posttranscriptional microRNA and small interfering RNA pathways and the transcriptional RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway. These findings have in turn been exploited for developing artificial RNA silencing technologies such as hairpin RNA, artificial microRNA, intrinsic direct repeat, 3’ UTR inverted repeat, artificial trans-acting siRNA, and virus-induced gene silencing technologies. Some of theseRNA silencing technologies, such as the hairpin RNA technology, have already been widely used for genetic improvement of crop plants in agriculture. For horticultural plants, RNA silencing technologies have been used to increase disease and pest resistance, alter plant architecture and flowering time, improve commercial traits of fruits and flowers, enhance nutritional values, remove toxic compounds and allergens, and develop high-value industrial products. In this article we aim to provide an overview of the RNA silencing pathways in plants, summarize the existing RNA silencing technologies, and review the current progress in applying these technologies for the improvement of agricultural crops particularly horticultural crops.

    Keywords:

    Double-stranded RNA, Hairpin RNA, miRNA, Plants, RNA silencing, siRNA, Virus

    Affiliation:

    1College of Horticulture & Landscape Architecture, Southwest University, Chongqing, 400716, China., 2Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Agriculture, Clunies Ross Street, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia.


    Read Full-Text article

    Genome-assisted Breeding For Drought Resistance

    Author(s):

    Awais Khan, Valpuri Sovero and Dorcus GemenetPages 330-342 (13)

    Abstract:


    Drought stress caused by unpredictable precipitation poses a major threat to food production worldwide, and its impact is only expected to increase with the further onset of climate change. Understanding the effect of drought stress on crops and plants' response is critical for developing improved varieties with stable high yield to fill a growing food gap from an increasing population depending on decreasing land and water resources. When a plant encounters drought stress, it may use multiple response types, depending on environmental conditions, drought stress intensity and duration, and the physiological stage of the plant. Drought stress responses can be divided into four broad types: drought escape, drought avoidance, drought tolerance, and drought recovery, each characterized by interacting mechanisms, which may together be referred to as drought resistance mechanisms. The complex nature of drought resistance requires a multi-pronged approach to breed new varieties with stable and enhanced yield under drought stress conditions. High throughput genomics and phenomics allow marker-assisted selection (MAS) and genomic selection (GS), which offer rapid and targeted improvement of populations and identification of parents for rapid genetic gains and improved drought-resistant varieties. Using these approaches together with appropriate genetic diversity, databases, analytical tools, and well-characterized drought stress scenarios, weather and soil data, new varieties with improved drought resistance corresponding to grower preferences can be introduced into target regions rapidly.

    Keywords:

    Drought stress, Genomics, Phenomics, Breeding, Marker-assisted selection, Physiological processes.

    Affiliation:

    International Potato Center (CIP), Avenida La Molina 1895, Lima 12, Peru.

    Graphical Abstract:



    Read Full-Text article

    Exploring Genetic Diversity in Plants Using High-Throughput Sequencing Techniques

    Author(s):

    Yoshihiko Onda and Keiichi MochidaPages 358-367 (10)

    Abstract:


    Food security has emerged as an urgent concern because of the rising world population. To meet the food demands of the near future, it is required to improve the productivity of various crops, not just of staple food crops. The genetic diversity among plant populations in a given species allows the plants to adapt to various environmental conditions. Such diversity could therefore yield valuable traits that could overcome the food-security challenges. To explore genetic diversity comprehensively and to rapidly identify useful genes and/or allele, advanced high-throughput sequencing techniques, also called nextgeneration sequencing (NGS) technologies, have been developed. These provide practical solutions to the challenges in crop genomics. Here, we review various sources of genetic diversity in plants, newly developed genetic diversity-mining tools synergized with NGS techniques, and related genetic approaches such as quantitative trait locus analysis and genome- wide association study.

    Keywords:

    Genetic diversity, NGS technology, Genotyping, QTL analysis, GWAS, Crop improvement.

    Affiliation:

    Cellulose Production Research Team, RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, Yokohama, Japan.

    Graphical Abstract:



    Read Full-Text article